Quote of the Week — 12.14.15

DTS_Tailor3

Errands are so effective at killing great projects that a lot of people use them for that purpose. Someone who has decided to write a novel, for example, will suddenly find that the house needs cleaning. People who fail to write novels don’t do it by sitting in front of a blank page for days without writing anything. They do it by feeding the cat, going out to buy something they need for their apartment, meeting a friend for coffee, checking email. “I don’t have time to work,” they say. And they don’t; they’ve made sure of that.

Paul Graham

Quote of the Week — 12.14.15

Use Procastination for Good

DeathtoStock_Creative Community9Paul Graham is a programmer, writer and investor who posts consistently thought-provoking essays on his web site. His thoughts on procrastination struck me as particularly helpful (especially his point that doing creative work always trumps cleaning the house).

He writes:

“There are three variants of procrastination, depending on what you do instead of working on something: you could work on (a) nothing, (b) something less important, or (c) something more important. That last type, I’d argue, is good procrastination.

That’s the “absent-minded professor,” who forgets to shave, or eat, or even perhaps look where he’s going while he’s thinking about some interesting question. His mind is absent from the everyday world because it’s hard at work in another.

That’s the sense in which the most impressive people I know are all procrastinators. They’re type-C procrastinators: they put off working on small stuff to work on big stuff.”

Use Procastination for Good